Govt to crackdown on counterfeit vet drugs dealers

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Some of measures include registering all manufacturers of animal drugs, chemicals, acaricides and agrochemicals; reregistering and licensing all importers or animal drugs, chemical, acaricides and agrochemicals.

Minister of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, Vincent Bamulangaki Ssempijja. Photo/File

Jolted by a tick epidemic that has resulted in annual losses of up to sh3.8 trillion – about a fifth of Uganda’s 2018/2019 budget — in revenue, the Government has launched a countrywide crackdown on counterfeit vet drug dealers.  

In addition, the government has released new control measures and regulations on importation, manufacture, distribution and retailing of animal drugs, biological chemicals and acaricides as well as agrochemicals.

This, Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries (MAAIF) said, is intended to control the influx of adulterated animal drugs, chemicals, acaricides and agrochemicals, which have resulted in huge loses to the economy as the chemicals have failed to cure intended pests and diseases.

Some of measures include registering all manufacturers of animal drugs, chemicals, acaricides and agrochemicals; reregistering and licensing all importers or animal drugs, chemical, acaricides and agrochemicals.

“Only licensed and certified importers and dealers will be allowed to deal in animal drugs, chemicals, acaricides and agrochemicals,” said a statement signed by Agriculture minister, Bamulangaki Sempijja.  

“Government is giving a three months transition period for which the importers and dealers are required to comply with the above regulatory directive,” added the statement.

MAAIF said it has cast a wide net on perpetrators and will undertake a joint enforcement with National Drug authority, Uganda Bureau of Standards and other ministries and agencies in its crackdown.   

The ministry advises the public to report any suspicious adulterated drugs on sale to police.

Uganda is one of the countries hit hardest by tick-borne diseases (TBD), with over 30% of the calf crop reportedly lost to TBDs such as theileriosis, babesiosis, and anaplasmosis, according to a 2016 report titled Emergence of Multi-acaricide Resistant Rhipicephalus Ticks and its Implication on Chemical tick Control in Uganda.  

Western Uganda is the most affected according to the report.

 

NewVision.co.ug

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