Government to set minimum bar for higher courses

0
8
By PATIENCE AHIMBISIBWE

KAMPALA. The Ministry of Education has tasked the National Council for Higher Education (NCHE) to develop minimum standards for all programmes taught in institutions of higher learning.
Mr Robert Odok Oceng, the director for Higher Education at the ministry, yesterday said with a framework in place, it will be easy to address the existing training gaps from the various institutions.
He made the remarks at a workshop organised by Makerere University and NCHE under the USAID and Unicef support, to review social work curricula across universities, in order to attain uniformity on the minimum standards agreeable to all stakeholders.
The review followed a study by Makerere University in May that established that 12.7 per cent of the 18 institutions surveyed had standards on social work education and training course but were not documented.
The study also identified that only 27 per cent of the supervisors assist their students in analysing research data while six out of 14 heads of department were found with no qualifications relevant to the course they are teaching and supervising.
Dr Ronald Luwangula, the researcher, said: “There are discrepancies around social work education in universities teaching the course across the country and we hope we come up with minimum standards to guide various institutions.”
“As government, we commend such initiatives and will want to challenge NCHE to develop more minimum standards for all programmes. I am optimistic that the curriculum being developed will be adopted by all higher education institutions training social work and will specifically seek to address the existing gaps in training, education and social work practices,” Mr Oceng said in a statement.

Framework
Dr Alex Kagume, the NCHE acting executive director, said they had completed a framework for courses in medicine, engineering and education, which will be used by all institutions in the East African Community.
Currently, NCHE has less than 10 per cent of the minimum standards for courses being taught in institutions of higher learning.
The council depends on professional bodies to recommend the content to be included in a particular course before they can accredit any course.

Monitor.co.ug

Facebook Comments

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here